Historic Findings: A Roman Neighborhood

53370801 - roman theatre in dougga - the former capital of numidia. tunisia

sergxfq / 123RF Stock Photo

Roman Theatre in Dougga – the former capital of Numidia. Tunisia

Welcome to France! We’ll be starting our survey of information here. A preserved Roman neighborhood was discovered in Sainte Colombe, a small commune across from Vienne in southeastern France. The finds are already quite impressive. They include:

  • Metalwork Shops
  • Food stores
  • Artisanal shops
  • A warehouse with wine jugs
  • Two houses containing mosaics
  • A hydraulic network
  • A large public complex comprised of a school of philosophy (possibly) and altar.

There were two fires during its heyday which ironically preserved its architecture. Benjamin Clément, an archaeologist with Archeodunum, is working on the area with 15 archaeologists and 5 interns. It may yet prove to be an excellent example of an entirely preserved Roman area, similarly to how we now have entire European cities preserved from the Middle Ages.

A Byzantine chapel’s remains from 1,600 years ago were discovered in Kilis, a border city with Syria. A mosaic was found as part of the chapel with inscriptions as well. Unfortunately this place was not part of any archaeological dig. They were discovered when security forces found illegal excavations going on and informed the government which took possession of the site. The mosaic had been destroyed partially but will be moved soon.

Mosaic

Pottery pieces labeled with ANT have been uncovered in Antiocheia Ad Cragum, an ancient Roman city in Antalya, the south of Turkey and a popular tourist area. The dig was overseen by Professor Michael Hoff (Nebraska University) who has been digging out the city for years.   

Pottery

A 2,000 year old necropolis in Uşak, near Afyonkarahisar in the west, featured dozens of rock cut tombs for the dead but lacking actual human remains. Local archaeologists believe that they are symbolic and meant to represent fallen soldiers.  

Rock Necropolis

A funerary epigraph was discovered in Porta Stabia (part of Pompeii) showing the life of the person, a city magistrate, along with a gladiatorial brawl in 59 CE that very well may have resulted in the person’s death.

Pompeii Grave

Check out pictures 3-5 here.

Carthage was once the capital of a great country, the antagonist to Rome and an amazing civilization. An excavation near the city has unveiled a man buried in the bleachers of the Roman race track. Dr. Ralf Bockmannread, head of a team of German archaeological team, led the dig.

Racing Burial

 

For more articles related to science & history go to Historic & Scientific Findings and check out my other pages for excellent content on science, technology, history and more!

 

 

 

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