Runaway Achaean Slaves

During the period after the 2nd Macedonian War, certain states refused Macedonians entry to their nations. Ever since Philip defeated the Athenians and Thebans at the Battle of Chaeronea , Macedonia had tried to retain control over all of Greece as a larger empire. There were previous revolts but Greece started slipping away when the empire broke up as multiple Diadochi including Antipater, Antigonus and Lysimachus competed for ownership of the Greek section of the empire. This infighting did much to weaken them and allowed the Greek states breathing room for their agendas. Slowly over time the Macedonians were pushed away from Greece as Sparta, the Aetolian League and Achaean League grew strong enough regionally to compete with them among the other city-states. The old powers of Athens and Sparta had begun fading into history and could no longer control Greek politics as they once did.

The warfare itself along with the feeling of subjugation, reminiscent of the Persian attempt hundreds of years ago, established a deeper hatred and contempt for Macedonians. One consequence of this was that slaves from Achaea in the Pelopponesus would run away to Macedon. The Achaean League would not allow any Macedonian citizens to enter their federation and, likewise, the Macedonians wouldn’t allow citizens from hostile nations to enter their country either. Until Perseus decided to reverse policy, Macedonia was a refuge for these slaves from the vile institution.

Livy, The History of Rome – Book 41, Chapter 23
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.02.0149%3Abook%3D41%3Achapter%3D23

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